Emacs Redux

Return to the Essence of Text Editing

Remap Return to Control in GNU/Linux

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A long time ago I wrote about remapping Return to Control in OS X. This was the best productivity boost for my Emacs experience ever!

Recently I’ve bought a Windows ultrabook (wanted something as light as MacBook Air, but more powerful and versatile) and I’m doing most of my work there in a Xubuntu VM. The first thing I did while setting up Xubuntu was to figure out how to do the aforementioned remapping.

In my original post some people suggested the tool xcape, so I took a look at it. The tool can certainly use some documentation improvements (and pre-built packages), but it gets the job done. After you’ve installed it you just need to add the following to your login shell’s init file (e.g. .bash_profile) and you’re in business:

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xmodmap -e "remove Control = Control_R"
xmodmap -e "keycode 0x69 = Return"
xmodmap -e "keycode 0x24 = Control_R"
xmodmap -e "add Control = Control_R"

xcape -t 10000 -e "Control_R=Return"

Obviously the first time around you should source .bash_profile after updating it:

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$ . .bash_profile

This is definitely a lot more work than just clicking in the GUI of the wonderful Karabiner, but it yields the desired results and that’s what’s important at the end of the day.

Now if only there was a way to achieve the same result in Windows…

P.S. vim users will love xcape. Its default behaviour is to generate the Escape key when Left Control is pressed and released on its own.

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